Loading…
Comic-Con 2018 has ended

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

1: Programs [clear filter]
Thursday, July 19
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference #1: Comic Origins
UPDATED: Thu, Jul 12, 09:40AM
Michael Connerty (IADT, Dublin) examines how popular elements of cartooning from the U.S. were adapted and ultimately helped to shape the development of British comic strip language at the turn of the 20th century. Brad Ricca (Case Western Reserve University) reveals a new understanding of Superman's origin in Andrew "King of Steel" Carnegie's Hero Fund: the hidden source of Siegel and Shuster's last "lost story" (Action Comics #1000), Siegel's commentary on DC's growing stable of commercial superheroes. Nicholas Sammond (University of Toronto) chronicles the importance of libertarianism and the strong influences of the Beats on the ethos of underground comix.

Thursday July 19, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 26AB

12:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #2: Comics, Costumes, and Cultural Appropriation
Modern comics, animation, and related media exhibit an unprecedented degree of diverse representation, but they also raise serious questions about cultural appropriation. Must creators color within the lines of their own heritage? Is wearing a Black Panther costume problematic for anyone not of African descent? Does using folklore or cultural imagery require asking permission from source communities-or even paying them royalties? Jeff Trexler (Fordham School of Law, Fashion Law Institute), Susan Scafidi (Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law), Douriean Fletcher (Douriean.com; specialty jeweler, Black Panther), and Joseph P. Illidge (Valiant) discuss the history, theory, and ethics of comics and cultural exchange.

Thursday July 19, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #3: Attorneys vs. Historians: Who Authors the Authorship Narrative?
The history of comic authorship is partly autobiographical and anecdotal, but such statements are often made simultaneously with litigation. Witness "recollections" are therefore framed with the "assistance" of corporate counsel but treated by historians as unfiltered accounts of events. James Thompson (Comic Book Historians group), Danny Barer (Pollak, Vida & Barer law firm), and Alex Grand (Comic Book Historians group) explore Golden Age and Silver Age authorial history but with the addition of legal contextualization-thereby suggesting motivations other than ego or differing perspectives for both idea origins and contractual (mis)understandings.

Thursday July 19, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 26AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #4: Comics and Healing
Kenneth Rogers Jr. (Heroes, Villains, and Healing: A Guide for Male Survivors of Child Sexual Abuse Using DC Comic Superheroes and Villains) shows how the DC heroes and villains whom people love and love to hate can be used to help heal the trauma of PTSD in survivors of childhood sexual abuse. Mara Wood (Wonder Woman Psychology) demonstrates how using a bibliotherapeutic framework can help middle grade students gain an understanding of the prosocial behaviors Wonder Woman models and how to translate those behaviors into their daily interactions. Whitney Porter (Kent State University) views Emil Ferris's My Favorite Thing Is Monsters through a psychoanalytic feminist lens to consider the protective and reparative abilities of monstrous embodiment in graphic storytelling for women.

Thursday July 19, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Friday, July 20
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference #5: Girls Rock
Melissa Colleen Stevenson (Stanford University) explores the ways Brian K. Vaughan's Paper Girls offers a complex and nuanced representation of a fantastical world through the eyes of girls. Ji-Hyae Park (Roosevelt University) argues that the kind of "girl" featured in graphic memoirs by Raina Telgemeier (Smile), Lucy Knisley (Margaret and the Moon), and Liz Prince (Tomboy) may be ordinary, but not mainstream, and would be recognized and embraced by readers as fellow or proto-"fangirl." John A. Walsh (Indiana University) explores pre-Internet participatory culture in the form of reader-contributed content to Marvel's Millie the Model humor and fashion comics, including Trina Robbins' Misty.

Friday July 20, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 26AB

12:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #6: Two Women and Wonder Woman
Trina Robbins (Pretty in Ink: North American Women Cartoonists, 1896-2013) and Nicky Wheeler-Nicholson (DC Comics Before Superman: Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson's Pulp Comics) confront constructions of Wonder Woman. Nicholson, in a critique of Jill Lepore's The Secret History of Wonder Woman, writes about the importance of Greek mythology to the birth of Wonder Woman and the use of that mythology in the stories. Robbins discusses the politics present in the Golden Age Wonder Woman stories.

Friday July 20, 2018 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room 26AB

1:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #7: Intersectional Identity in Box of Bones
Members of the creative team of Box of Bones- a Black lesbian, alternative history, gothic horror revenge fantasy with scholarly essays-look at intersectional identity in the series as it relates to horror, alternative history, revenge and restorative justice, and its production. Creator John Jennings (University of California, Riverside) discusses the series' genesis; letterer Damian Duffy (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign) discusses its alternative history; colorist Stanford Carpenter (Pocket-Con) discusses the production and process; and essayist Ajani Brown (San Diego State University) discusses the incorporation of ethno-gothic themes and restorative justice.

Friday July 20, 2018 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room 26AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #8: From Civil Rights to Black Panther
Andrea Johnson (California State University, Dominguez Hills) discusses how the 1957 comic Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story dramatized the bus boycott, solidified adherence to nonviolence forms of protest, and inspired John Lewis and others to become involved in the movement. Jennie Law (Georgia State University) traces the iconic black panther first as a symbol for the Lowndes County Freedom Organization, SNCC's black voter registration drive, and into the creation of Marvel's first black superhero, the Black Panther. Evan Johnson (Rutgers University) places Ta-Nehisi Coates's Black Panther in conversation with black theorists such as Achille Mbembe, Franz Fanon, and the Combahee River Collective to illustrate how Coates explores the limits of black radical thought in the wake of imperial and patriarchal power that is removed from white supremacy.

Friday July 20, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Saturday, July 21
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference #9: Focus on David Mack
Comic-Con special guest David Mack (Kabuki, Daredevil) will discuss his work as a writer and artist in comic books; his travels for the State Department as a cultural ambassador; his work in TV and film, including the Emmy-nominated opening titles of Netflix's Jessica Jones and the main titles art for Captain America: The Winter Soldier; creating the new music videos for Dashboard Confessional and Amanda Palmer; and his current work on the new Kabuki TV show from Sony based on his award-winning graphic novel series of the same name. Neil Gaiman's assistant and producer Cat Mihos (Neil Gaiman: Dream Dangerously) moderates a conversation that may turn to the recent work David has done with Neil on the new Sandman Universe, the covers for the American Gods comic book series, David's work on both the Jessica Jones TV series and the comic book, his work as a writer on Daredevil and its influence on the Netflix show, his creation of the Marvel character Echo, his recent work on Superman, Batman, Black Panther, and more.

Saturday July 21, 2018 10:30am - 11:30am
Room 26AB

11:30am

Comics Arts Conference #10: Chasing Captain America: Physiology and Philosophy from Stem Cells to Socrates
What if we could really create Captain America-should we? We are now approaching the point where the Super-Soldier Serum and Vita-Rays meet the reality of bioengineering. Thanks to the convergence of biology, engineering, and technology, we can now alter our abilities through surgery, pharmaceutical enhancement, technological fusion, and genetic engineering. E. Paul Zehr (Chasing Captain America: How Advances in Science, Engineering and Biotechnology Will Produce a Superhuman), Mark D. White (The Virtues of Captain America: Modern-Day Lessons on Character from a World War II Superhero), Daniel H. Wilson (Amped, Robopocalypse), and G. Willow Wilson (Ms. Marvel, Alif the Unseen) discuss the physiology and philosophy of superhumanity with moderator Andrea Letamendi (Under the Mask).

Saturday July 21, 2018 11:30am - 12:30pm
Room 26AB

12:30pm

Comics Arts Conference #11: Trauma and Memoir
Ira Zukanovic (University of California, Los Angeles) demonstrates how Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis is about the process of formulating (and reformulating) a sense of identity in the wake of a political trauma. Using comics and cultural hybridity theory, Isabelle Martin (University of Kentucky) analyzes the role of photography in relationships between personal memory and collective memory, family history, and cultural history in Thi Bui's graphic memoir The Best We Could Do. Emmy Waldman (Harvard University) examines and explicates Art Spiegelman's comics-making after Mauschwitz, focusing on his avant-garde 2008 graphic-memoir-cum-comics-manifesto Breakdowns/Portrait of the Artist as a Young %@&*!

Saturday July 21, 2018 12:30pm - 2:00pm
Room 26AB

2:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #12: The Poster Session
The CAC's poster session gives attendees the opportunity to interact directly with presenters. Come talk one-on-one with these scholars about their projects! Barbara Glaeser (California State University, Fullerton), Leigh Shocki (Alaska Airlines), Christina Schultz (Alaska Airlines), Andrew Sanchez (AT&T), Carl Renold (California State University, Fullerton), and Hernani Ledesma (California State University, Dominguez Hills) illustrate effective ways that comics are being used to shape employee and student learning. Jeremiah Massengale (University of the Cumberlands) discusses the unique capabilities of the comics medium to help readers experience the world through the perspective of a person who is deaf or hearing impaired. Cathy Leogrande (Le Moyne College) focuses on fan adoration of Harley Quinn and the range of their reactions since the Harvey Weinstein/#MeToo zeitgeist. Christopher Warren, Gino Galvez, and Jonelle Prideaux (California State University, Long Beach) use a systematic analysis of comic book character occupations to discern how gender and racial attributes correspond to the lines of traditional discrimination and job segregation. Elysia Poon (School for Advanced Research, Indian Arts Research Center) highlights the recent publication of an anthology of comic art by Native women artists to examine how the comic medium plays a crucial role in giving voice to a highly underrepresented section of our society. D'Ondre Swails (Brown University) interrogates the cultural politics surrounding comic book villains of color, particularly ones of African descent. Allen Thomas (University of Central Arkansas) breaks down the benefit of black comic book characters in bibliotherapy to provide an avenue through which African American clients at the intersections of varied identities can fully and truly see themselves. Cori Knight (University of California, Riverside) uses the webcomic Girl Genius to look at how sidekicks and assistants evolved from two-dimensional, cardboard entities into real characters in their own right. Shelley Lloyd (Clemson University) reads Marvel's Black Widows as both feminine and cyborg using the works of Donna Haraway and Hélène Cixous. Sydney Heifler (University of Oxford) traces a 1970s trend of romance comics writers addressing the Women's Liberation Movement by appropriating the Movement's themes to offer a new "feminism" that mirrored normative and explicitly antifeminist views. Tiffany Babb examines Saladin Ahmed and Christian Ward's Black Bolt as an example of how impermanent death holds weight, both emotionally and structurally, in superhero narratives in comics. Valentino L. Zullo (Kent State University) considers the work of the Cleveland Public Library in leading comics programming and the role of the public library in the future of comics scholarship, literacy, and the promotion of humanistic ideas. Brendan Gillett (NYC Department of Education) uses Scott Pilgrim as a source text to engage in simultaneous multiliteracy exercises while producing transmedial adaptations. Derek Heid (Temecula Valley High School) examines Jeff Lemire's breakdown of the family through a lack of open and honest communication and how the fragmentation of the family unit risks the coherency of the world itself. Anita McDaniel (University of North Carolina, Wilmington) analyzes Zack Snyder's ironic use of diegetic and non-diegetic music in Watchmen to disrupt the audience's suspension of disbelief and to challenge to the superhero genre's moral imperative. Kathryn Houk and Bredny Rodriguez (University of Nevada Las Vegas) explore the challenges they had as librarians building a print-based graphic medicine collection in a primarily digital library. Eric Bruce and Emily A. Lilo (Western Oregon University) share their lesson plan, grounded in social cognitive theory, to create space for complex conversations with youth about their life experiences using comics characters as the vehicles. Nicole Kroushl (University of North Carolina, Wilmington) examines the narrative coherence of The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina in which witchcraft is a stand-in for American Christian fundamentalism. Noah Simonson (Hillsboro School District) presents a case study exploring the integration of comics as additive classroom texts into four Next Generation Science Standards-aligned science units. Danielle Kohfeldt, Charlene Vo, Maricela Correa-Chavez, and John Nguyen (California State University, Long Beach) explore how forms of engagement in comics-related fandoms may be partially shaped by a person's relative power in society, with a special focus on gender, sexuality, and race/ethnicity. Pamela Jackson (San Diego State University)explores the ways the San Diego State University Library uses critical librarianship to encourage critical thinking and scholarship on issues of identity, social justice, human rights, and economic equality using their comic arts collection. Benjamin G. Barrena and Todd C. Lilje (Naval Medical Center San Diego) use the depiction of doctor-patient interaction in Peter Dunlap-Shohl's My Degeneration: A Journey Through Parkinson's to argue that by stressing the experiential and the aesthetic over the technical, the graphic novel medium provides a particularly powerful format for pushing doctors to see through their patients' eyes. Divya Jindal-Snape (University of Dundee) traces the creation of Fibromyalgia and Us (2017), which was co-created by four people living with fibromyalgia, health care professionals, family members, comic artists, and experts to illustrate the life transitions caused by fibromyalgia and its impact.

Saturday July 21, 2018 2:00pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB
 
Sunday, July 22
 

10:30am

Comics Arts Conference #13: Imagined Communities
Tony Chavarria (Museum of Indian Arts & Culture) examines Krazy Kat's fictional Coconino County as a presentation of how the indigenous peoples of the Southwest view their ancestral homelands. Jay Olinger (Portland Community College) places Fletcher Hanks' Fantomah as the first superheroine while also considering her mission within a modern context, proving that looking back at comics history can indeed help us move forward. Phillip Vaughan (University of Dundee) looks at the creation and ongoing production of Saltire, a Scottish superhero steeped in the mythology and folklore of Caledonian history, who served as a symbol for political feelings during the 2014 Scottish independence referendum.

Sunday July 22, 2018 10:30am - 12:00pm
Room 26AB

12:00pm

Comics Arts Conference #14: Comics from East to West
Ayanni C. H. Cooper (University of Florida) addresses discrepancies between the anime and manga versions of Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind by focusing on the manga of Nausicaä and positioning the text as climate fiction, using Miyazaki's "ecophilosophy" and his Shinto-esque leanings as a lens. Golnar Nabizadeh (University of Dundee) looks at Henry Yoshitaka Kiyama's 1927 comic The Four Immigrants Manga: A Japanese Experience in San Francisco, which demonstrates the power of comics to capture and convey the complexity of migrant memories as it portrays the (mis)adventures of four Japanese Issei in San Francisco. Shirin E. Edwin (New York University Shanghai) argues that Al-Mutawa's The 99, hailed in North America and Europe as a timely response to the stereotypes of Islam, inspired in the Arab world responses ranging from fatwas to accusations of commercialism; it has in fact provincialized and not globalized Islam.

Sunday July 22, 2018 12:00pm - 1:30pm
Room 26AB

1:30pm

Comics Arts Conference #15: International Collaborative TransMedia Narrative Comics II
The panel reflects on the mechanics and outcomes of an international, transmedia narrative-led teaching and research comics-making collaboration between graduate students at the University of Dundee and undergraduates from Penn State. Student Gigi DeFleurentin (Pennsylvania State University, Ablington College) will report on her experience with the project and introduce a video of the trip. Faculty Emily Steinberg (Pennsylvania State University, Ablington College), Damon Herd (University of Dundee), and Christopher Murray (University of Dundee) discuss their hope of taking their collaborative effort to a third location in the future, furthering their mission to facilitate students with vastly different life experiences in the creation of a shared narrative, knitting together the next generation of graphic storytellers in an ever more tightly knit world.

Sunday July 22, 2018 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Room 26AB

2:30pm

Comics Arts Conference #16: The Culture of Comic-Con: Field Studies of Fans and Marketing
Comic-Con offers students of popular culture an amazing venue to study how culture is marketed to and practiced by its fans. Jordan Bennet (Radford University), Margaret Clarke (Lynchburg College), Anthony Dannar (Auburn University), Carlos Flores (Arizona State University), Abbie Keane (Hollins University), Matthew Lunga (Radford University), Amari Page (University of Southern California), Abigail Tenshaw (Radford University), and Alison Woody (Hollins University) present initial findings from a week-long ethnographic field study of the intersection of fan practice at the nexus of cultural marketing and fan culture that is Comic-Con 2018. Matthew J. Smith (Radford University) moderates.

Sunday July 22, 2018 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Room 26AB